Multimedia

A personal war, at home

Photos

Jared Starkel returned from Iraq four years ago, but the memories of his service there have yet to leave him.

Recurring dreams and overwhelming, painful emotions oftentimes make daily interactions a complicated, internal struggle for Jared.

Now, with a wife and four children to support, Jared is trying even harder to combat his PTSD so he can spend more time with the family he loves.

A Gift Given

Co-authors: 
Photos

By Justin Murphy
News21 / Syracuse University

One thing about Ed Bush: He knows how to laugh.

It’s a hoarse belly chuckle that goes along with good news and bad. His gray ponytail and prodigious stomach get to bobbing; his small, sparkly eyes sparkle more brightly, casting about for someone to draw into the joke.

Ed didn’t always laugh like this.

Not as a gunner in Korea during the Vietnam War, when he rappelled from helicopters into a hail of midnight bullets with a simple task: eliminate.

PTSD Experience

Co-authors: 
Photos

When you boil it down, much of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder is born from the habits that people develop in a warzone in order to stay alive. This includes behavior like hypervigilence and constant suspicion. The trauma part comes in when a person returns home, but their mind is still in the warzone, trying to protect them from perceived threats -- at the mall, while grocery shopping or driving down the road.

Soldiers before Citizens

Co-authors: 
Photos

By Sherri Williams
News21 / Syracuse University

Headstones at Native American cemeteries tell the stories of warriors who fought for this country since its early days.

Alongside the graves of revered warriors Chief Joseph and Yellow Wolf, who battled white settlers to preserve Indian life and land, lay the lesser-known Native American soldiers who went to war to protect the United States.

Graves at the reservation cemeteries in Washington state mark some of the conflicts in which Native Americans served: WWII, Korea, Vietnam and even Grenada.

Wives Left Behind

Co-authors: 
Photos

By Sherri Williams
News21 / Syracuse University

Rayna Cawston has been through a war deployment. She understands the fear, loneliness and anxiety of having a husband in a combat zone.

When Rayna, 25, was afraid to sleep alone at night she had her girls — Mylia, 7, and Antya, 22 months — sleep with her. Scary noises Rayna heard at night prompted her to buy two intimidating dogs for an added sense of security. As Rayna’s loneliness lingered and her sadness swelled she started to take antidepressants, and had her family rally around her to support her.

Veterans in Washington state

Photos

Veterans featured above:

Capturing the land

Ken Harper shoots a forest road at dusk. Photo by David Miller

Today is our last full day in the woods of Washington state.  In thinking about how much I'll miss this beautiful place, I'm happy that we've spent so much of the last week really appreciating our surroundings. In creating our piece about the land, no seemingly impossible scenario or shot idea has stopped us from getting some beautiful footage.

Timelapse: 24 Hours in the Valley

Photo by:

In this video watch 24 hours unfold in 60 seconds, shot from the view out the window of the Syracuse News21 Bunkhouse in Republic, WA.

Can you hear me?

Jared gets his ears checked in Spokane for his VA benefits. Photo by: AJ Chavar
Co-authors: 

For more than half an hour, Jared Starkel waited nervously in the waiting room of a hospital clinic. Just a week ago, Starkel got his first sign of getting his benefits—a packet of paperwork in the mail from the Department of Veterans Affairs. Today, with no more than two days notice, Jared sat waiting to have his hearing examined for his benefits claim. 

Syndicate content